Can too much insulation cause condensation?

Moisture and insulation Poorly installed insulation is one of the main causes of condensation in the attic, especially when too much insulation traps warm air near the roof and forces condensation. Too long; I didn't read, yes, too much insulation can cause condensation.

Can too much insulation cause condensation?

Moisture and insulation Poorly installed insulation is one of the main causes of condensation in the attic, especially when too much insulation traps warm air near the roof and forces condensation. Too long; I didn't read, yes, too much insulation can cause condensation. This is because excessive insulation leads to poor ventilation inside the house and, as a result, prevents humid air from escaping to the outside and becomes more prone to condensation on cold surfaces and walls. Yes, insulation absorbs up to half an inch to an inch of water per day at temperatures above 60 degrees.

In addition, insulation can only absorb a limited amount of condensation before it becomes a problem. When too much moisture enters the insulation, it can lead to the development of mold and mildew. So, can too much loft insulation cause condensation? Yes, it can, and it can also wreak havoc on your home. Even after a system is isolated, condensation may form as a result of miscalculation or poor installation.

If the engineer does not take into account the extreme humidity conditions of the space or if the system operates outside normal design parameters, the thickness of the insulation will not be sufficient to compensate for the increase in water vapor in the air, and condensation will form as the surface temperature drops below dew point. The insulation must also be installed correctly; any gaps in the insulation or any small openings in the vapor retarder will cause condensation and must be sealed immediately. Cold water pipe insulation is the wrong place to try value engineering when designing new or replacement pipes. Not only will the insulation have to be replaced if the formation of condensation is not identified in time, but also the system pipes, ducts or other components must be replaced, along with any surrounding equipment on which condensation dripped.

Pete recently did an interview on BBC Radio 4 - You and Yours - which investigated a case of insulation of defective cavity walls. Corrosion under insulation (CUI) of operating equipment and steel pipes is a major problem in the ammonia, cold water, chemical and petroleum refrigeration industries. Moisture ingress is the absorption of water into a porous material that leads to an increase in thermal conductivity and deterioration of the insulation system. A quick Google search will reveal that there are hundreds of companies specializing in the removal of cavity and loft insulation.

I mean, yes, the wall may be cold on the outside (the outer surface), but the insulation material prevents that low temperature from entering and the inner surface of the wall from staying warm. This is a common practice for insulation of cavity walls that get wet due to rainwater penetrating the outer wall. Unfortunately, insulation is often overlooked or taken for granted, even though insulation offers the simplest and most economical opportunity to save energy costs if maintained. Because the insulation prevents heat from escaping, the temperature of the loft, for example, would stay warm naturally.

If a porous insulating material is used, a vapor retarder is absolutely necessary to prevent water vapor from passing through the insulation and condensing. Corrosion Under Insulation (CUI) can form when water is trapped between the system and insulation, strongly corroding the metal underneath. If you have installed modern wall, ceiling or floor insulation on a period property and you have problems with moisture, mold or condensation, you probably need to remove the offending material and replace it with something more breathable. .

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